Twitter Mentoring – Research Discussion

What do you think about mentoring relationships on Twitter?

Mentoring has traditionally been viewed as a formal relationship between an experienced person and novice, with the experienced person offering support, encouragement, connections and opportunities for the novice to grow in the profession. However, there are other views of mentoring. Barr (2013) offers an alternative perspective on mentoring:

“In the real world, mentors are usually organic relationships without specific titles, goals or responsibilities. Mentors are most often simply experienced people you get to know and look to for advice, informally and organically. They’re people you go to coffee with, people you ask for guidance, and people you call when there’s a big decision to make.”

So, what are your personal views of mentoring and how Twitter fits (or does not fit) into this model? Please feel free to answer or discuss any of the questions below (you do not have to answer all of them).

  • What do you think of when people talk about ‘mentoring’?

  • Does your view of mentoring fit into what you do on Twitter? If so, how? If not, why?

  • Do you see Twitter as a tool to enable you to form relationships?

  • If so, what kind of relationships does Twitter allow you to form?

  • How do you use Twitter to identify interesting people/mentors (in the library and information profession and wider) to follow and learn from?

  • Have you been mentored by someone on Twitter? Can you think of someone on Twitter you look up to as a mentor?

  • Are you able to give an example of how you have used Twitter to either mentor/give someone advice, or receive mentorship/advice from someone else?

  • If you think that Twitter is useful for mentoring, do you think it is more appropriate for a traditional, one-on-one mentoring relationship between an experienced person and a beginner, or a peer-mentoring approach, or a different sort entirely? Why?

  • Or conversely, do you think that Twitter is perhaps not suited to mentoring or is not an appropriate tool to use in a mentoring relationship? Why?

I’m collecting ideas for a research assignment about mentoring using Twitter, and would love to hear your perspectives (as librarians) of Twitter as a tool to establish and cultivate mentoring relationships. I will collate these findings and talk about the themes that emerge. I will not mention anyone by name or identify them in my research. I will share a summary of the results in a blog post here on the New Professionals NZ website.

There are no geographical limits; I would like to hear from any librarian using Twitter!

You can answer these questions in a number of ways:

  •  a tweet (or series of tweets) using #TwitMentoring
  • a comment on this blog post
  • a separate blog post on your blog if you would prefer (but please ping-back to this blog so I can find it :D)
  • or via an email to me.

If you have any further questions about my research, please feel free to send me an e-mail. I look forward to hearing your ideas!

Thank you in advance for your consideration of this topic.

Abigail Willemse.
@ajwillemse91

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21 Responses to Twitter Mentoring – Research Discussion

  1. Pingback: Twitter Mentoring Research – Calling all librarians for your ideas! | New Professionals NZ

  2. Cath Sheard says:

    These are interesting questions Abigail. I’ll be interested to hear what you uncover. Here’s my $10 worth (for 2c, always allow for inflation!)

    What do you think of when people talk about ‘mentoring’? Guidance, encouragement, support, transfer of skills.

    Does your view of mentoring fit into what you do on Twitter? If so, how? If not, why? Yes, mainly.

    Do you see Twitter as a tool to enable you to form relationships? Yes, absolutely. I think it’s much more useful in that regard than FaceBook and possibly even LinkedIn because it’s so interactive.

    How do you use Twitter to identify interesting people/mentors (in the library and information profession and wider) to follow and learn from?

    Have you been mentored by someone on Twitter? Can you think of someone on Twitter you look up to as a mentor? There are a couple of people who have mentored me via Twitter and I have been grateful for their input. Nicki Moen, Joanne Dillon and Sally Pewhairangi stand out for me as people who are supportive and encouraging, but also able to say “hey, hang on…”.

    Are you able to give an example of how you have used Twitter to either mentor/give someone advice, or receive mentorship/advice from someone else? I’ve used Twitter to give support to librarians about projects they’re involved with, and find it works well for quick “you’ll be fine” or “try this…” comments.

    If you think that Twitter is useful for mentoring, do you think it is more appropriate for a traditional, one-on-one mentoring relationship between an experienced person and a beginner, or a peer-mentoring approach, or a different sort entirely? Why? I feel one of the things Twitter does is flatten out the layers so that, although you know in theory someone is older/more experienced etc, you can communicate without so many barriers. A flatter playing field if you like!

    Or conversely, do you think that Twitter is perhaps not suited to mentoring or is not an appropriate tool to use in a mentoring relationship? Why? I think there are times when the conversation needs to be private, so DMing can be useful. If it needs to go beyond the limits of 140 characters at a time, moving to email works well. I’m cautious about the fact that even a DM might somehow be public one day, so never say anything you wouldn’t write on a postcard on your bosses desk!

  3. librarykris says:

    What do you think of when people talk about ‘mentoring’?
    – An ongoing relationship between someone more experienced in a field and someone less experienced in a field. The more experienced person helps the less experienced person see the options available to them. There is an understanding between the two of them that they are in a mentoring relationship.

    Does your view of mentoring fit into what you do on Twitter? If so, how? If not, why?
    – Nope. While it might look similar to the sort of thing I do when I’m mentoring someone, I don’t have an understanding that we are in an ongoing mentoring relationship. I consider it closer to answering a ref enquiry.

    Do you see Twitter as a tool to enable you to form relationships?
    – Yes.

    If so, what kind of relationships does Twitter allow you to form?
    – Collegial, informal, starter to a more formal work-based relationship, ridiculous, shared fandom, one-sided, interactive.

    How do you use Twitter to identify interesting people/mentors (in the library and information profession and wider) to follow and learn from?
    – Checking out conversations; following links to blogs. It’s more important to me that someone on Twitter is interesting rather than what work they do.

    Have you been mentored by someone on Twitter? Can you think of someone on Twitter you look up to as a mentor?
    – No. I can think of people I look to as examples of inspiring librarians/managers/information workers etc.

    Are you able to give an example of how you have used Twitter to either mentor/give someone advice, or receive mentorship/advice from someone else?
    – I was tweeted a request to be a mentor for a tweep as part of the LIANZA registration scheme. (I said yes.) While the advice that I have received (and given) might look like mentoring, I don’t consider that it is.

    If you think that Twitter is useful for mentoring, do you think it is more appropriate for a traditional, one-on-one mentoring relationship between an experienced person and a beginner, or a peer-mentoring approach, or a different sort entirely? Why?
    – If my definition of mentoring is taken as read then I think Twitter would be more useful as a one on one mentoring tool since the more people that are added to a conversation the fewer are available for the actual conversation. There are no rules for Twitter though – use it how you like.

    Or conversely, do you think that Twitter is perhaps not suited to mentoring or is not an appropriate tool to use in a mentoring relationship? Why?
    – I think Twitter is one of the tools that could be used during a mentoring relationship. However, because I think mentoring is about an ongoing relationship, helping a less experienced person to see the options available to them, then the 140 character limit could be a problem. Mentoring is also sometimes a very personal conversation which is not always something to play out in public.

  4. Mandicane says:

    For better or worse, here are my thoughts:
     What do you think of when people talk about ‘mentoring’?
    A formal, private one on one relationship of support, guidance, and advice. An ear to listen, someone who genuinely cares, usually an experienced person mentoring a less experienced person.
     Does your view of mentoring fit into what you do on Twitter? If so, how? If not, why?
    Not really, because I think of Twitter and the interactions/ relationships that form as a part of a professional and/or social network. It is looser, less defined, and public. You may not get what you need such as a considered thoughtful response. To me mentoring is a mutually agreed upon contract, for a specific purpose for a specified time.
     Do you see Twitter as a tool to enable you to form relationships?
    Absolutely. to connect, reconnect and maintain relationships – as long as the others engage too
     If so, what kind of relationships does Twitter allow you to form?
    positive, supportive ones for the most part. Mostly people tweet encouraging things, but it is unpredictable and unreliable. I don’t always connect to twitter, so I’m one of those unreliable tweeters! I’m not always available and I don’t expect others to be either through twitter.
     How do you use Twitter to identify interesting people/mentors (in the library and information profession and wider) to follow and learn from?
    I try to follow those who follow me, plus I look at who other colleagues follow, or interesting bloggers, conference speakers etc
     Have you been mentored by someone on Twitter? Can you think of someone on Twitter you look up to as a mentor?
    Not really because I think of twitter more as a network. And I haven’ really sought the things a mentoring relationship provides.
     Are you able to give an example of how you have used Twitter to either mentor/give someone advice, or receive mentorship/advice from someone else?
    can’t think of anything that qualifies…
     If you think that Twitter is useful for mentoring, do you think it is more appropriate for a traditional, one-on-one mentoring relationship between an experienced person and a beginner, or a peer-mentoring approach, or a different sort entirely? Why?
    not really. I think Twitter is useful for networking, so if anything I’d go with the peer-mentoring approach. And I like Cath’s comment about how Twitter levels the playing field. We can all learn from each other, we all have valuable skills and knowledge to share irrespective of our place in the professional journey.

     Or conversely, do you think that Twitter is perhaps not suited to mentoring or is not an appropriate tool to use in a mentoring relationship? Why?
    I think there are some ethics involved in a traditional mentoring relationship that I value such as privacy and safety. Sometimes the things you want to talk about are difficult, or involve someone you work closely with and you need a closed conversation for that.

  5. ajwillemse91 says:

    Thanks for your thoughts Cath, Kris, Amanda, and Shelley (by e-mail) – I really appreciate you taking the time to share them. I’m looking forward to all the discussion and then collating it all for my research and for a summary for you people! ;D

  6. megingle says:

    So many things to discuss! Here’s some of my initial thoughts based on the questions to hand:

    Q What do you think of when people talk about ‘mentoring’?
    A Sharing knowledge, supporting ideas, giving advice, a ‘safe’ space to check in, in an ongoing way not just one-off here & there. I often think of it as a one-to-one relationship, and one that is not conducted in the open as publicly as Twitter. For the moment, Twitter for me is many-to-one or one-to-many, but not one-to-one relationships. That could very well change.

    Q Does your view of mentoring fit into what you do on Twitter? If so, how? If not, why?
    A Twitter is an open part of my wider professional knowledge & learning network, but I view mentoring more as a one-to-one discussion that is longer than 140 characters.

    Q Do you see Twitter as a tool to enable you to form relationships?
    A Yes, collegial relationships, and learning networks.

    Q If so, what kind of relationships does Twitter allow you to form?
    A Hmm, not sure how to answer this, so will skip it for now.

    Q How do you use Twitter to identify interesting people/mentors (in the library and information profession and wider) to follow and learn from?
    A I check out who interesting people are following. I check out who is following me. I check out who is using particular hashtags.

    Q Have you been mentored by someone on Twitter? Can you think of someone on Twitter you look up to as a mentor?
    A No mentoring on Twitter, yet. My previous mentors aren’t on Twitter.

    I am going to think about the next three questions, as I am not sure exactly what I think about this for now.

    Q Are you able to give an example of how you have used Twitter to either mentor/give someone advice, or receive mentorship/advice from someone else?
    Q If you think that Twitter is useful for mentoring, do you think it is more appropriate for a traditional, one-on-one mentoring relationship between an experienced person and a beginner, or a peer-mentoring approach, or a different sort entirely? Why?
    Q Or conversely, do you think that Twitter is perhaps not suited to mentoring or is not an appropriate tool to use in a mentoring relationship? Why?

  7. Caroline Anderson says:

    ■What do you think of when people talk about ‘mentoring’?
    I think of a mentor as someone who has knowledge and experience in a particular field who is interested in helping others to gain knowledge and experience and who has therefore agreed to act as a sounding board for someone who has less experience and knowledge in that field. The mentee is guided by the mentor when they have questions about the particular field. The mentor is someone to whom the mentee can turn for support and guidance.

    ■Does your view of mentoring fit into what you do on Twitter? If so, how? If not, why?
    No. I don’t view Twitter as a channel for mentoring because it only allows short messages.
    ■Do you see Twitter as a tool to enable you to form relationships?
    To a point. Once again, because of the limit on message length, Twitter might enable one to start a conversation with someone, but I would not use it as a long-term communication tool thereafter.
    ■If so, what kind of relationships does Twitter allow you to form?

    ■How do you use Twitter to identify interesting people/mentors (in the library and information profession and wider) to follow and learn from?

    ■Have you been mentored by someone on Twitter? Can you think of someone on Twitter you look up to as a mentor?

    ■Are you able to give an example of how you have used Twitter to either mentor/give someone advice, or receive mentorship/advice from someone else?

    ■If you think that Twitter is useful for mentoring, do you think it is more appropriate for a traditional, one-on-one mentoring relationship between an experienced person and a beginner, or a peer-mentoring approach, or a different sort entirely? Why?

    ■Or conversely, do you think that Twitter is perhaps not suited to mentoring or is not an appropriate tool to use in a mentoring relationship? Why?

  8. ajwillemse91 says:

    Thanks for your thoughts Megan and Caroline – I really appreciate you taking the time to answer my research questions 🙂 Lots of food for thought!

  9. Pingback: Twitter mentoring » flexnib

  10. My response is on my blog here, Abigail.
    Thanks for asking these very interesting questions!

  11. Molly says:

    Molly @madradish here. Interesting topic!

    Q. What do you think of when people talk about ‘mentoring’?
    A. I think of a semi-formal relationship between two people based on a common interest or aim. I choose mentors who are the sort of librarians I want to be like or who have specific experience I’d like to learn more about. I see it as a two way relationship and I try to help my mentors with their aims where I can.

    Q. Does your view of mentoring fit into what you do on Twitter? If so, how? If not, why?
    A. Yes, in that I use twitter as a tool to communicate with (and learn from) my mentors. It’s generally not the sole tool I use for this purpose and I agree with others who have stated that the 140 character restriction is quite limited.

    Q. Do you see Twitter as a tool to enable you to form relationships?
    A. Yes, absolutely. I make friends, grow a PLN and interact daily with people on Twitter. It’s an important communication tool for me both personally and as part of my job.

    Q. If so, what kind of relationships does Twitter allow you to form?
    A. Friendships, learning relationships

    Q. How do you use Twitter to identify interesting people/mentors (in the library and information profession and wider) to follow and learn from?
    A. Via retweets, people who follow me, I sometimes check who people are following and I pay attention to Twitter recommendations.

    Q. Have you been mentored by someone on Twitter? Can you think of someone on Twitter you look up to as a mentor?
    A. Most of my mentors have twitter accounts but I don’t think that’s what you’re asking. I have been helped by people on twitter many times and some people have helped me or given advice repeatedly. I don’t really see that as mentoring in and of itself though, especially as it often happens when chatting with more than one person on twitter.

    Q. Are you able to give an example of how you have used Twitter to either mentor/give someone advice, or receive mentorship/advice from someone else?
    A. I’ve given advice about many things including technical things, job applications, even spinning wheel selection! One memorable occasion where I received advice was during NLS6 when I tweeted that I was considering management more seriously. I got some very helpful tweets as a result of that.

    Q. If you think that Twitter is useful for mentoring, do you think it is more appropriate for a traditional, one-on-one mentoring relationship between an experienced person and a beginner, or a peer-mentoring approach, or a different sort entirely? Why?
    A. I find it useful as one tool in a mentoring relationship. I do also think it can serve as a very loose peer-mentoring tool in a fashion, but this really depends on the personality of the people interacting. I’m a rather gregarious person, but I know others who prefer to lurk on Twitter and not say much. It might not be a good tool of choice for these guys.

    Q. Or conversely, do you think that Twitter is perhaps not suited to mentoring or is not an appropriate tool to use in a mentoring relationship? Why?
    A. I think I answered this in my last response. Twitter involves putting yourself out there in a fairly public way. This isn’t suited to everyone. It might also be difficult for those who find technology challenging.

    • ajwillemse91 says:

      Thanks Molly for your very thorough reply; it’s fantastic to have such detailed answers to inform my research! I’m really excited about it now and hope to settle down to writing in a week or two, but please keep the answers coming everyone; it’s fantastic 😉 I will post a summary here on the blog when I am finished my research – probably June as my research is due Queen’s birthday weekend 😀

  12. Pingback: All About Abigail | ANZ 23 Mobile Things

  13. What do you think of when people talk about ‘mentoring’? To me this is a one on one support network. Other words that spring to mind are skills teacher, sharing, sounding board, coach and reality check. I had a business coach once whose favourite question was why which was challenging but made me really examine what I was doing and was extremely helpful.

    Does your view of mentoring fit into what you do on Twitter? If so, how? If not, why? No – Twitter is more about ideas storming, sharing, seeing others views to help me form my own (do I agree, disagree, why…lol). It is also more public than I consider a true mentor relationship to be. By being public it lacks the objectivity of an outsider but the personal touch of a one on one relationship.

    Do you see Twitter as a tool to enable you to form relationships? Absolutely.

    If so, what kind of relationships does Twitter allow you to form? All kinds. Professional, social and personal. and often a mix of all three.

    How do you use Twitter to identify interesting people/mentors (in the library and information profession and wider) to follow and learn from? Follow links and people that colleagues and others I admire follow. Read widely professional publications and networks and search links (eg ALA movers and shakers, etc).

    Have you been mentored by someone on Twitter? Can you think of someone on Twitter you look up to as a mentor? I haven’t been officially mentored by anyone in the Library and information world, and not on Twitter. However there are those whose opinions I give more weight and substance to in terms of developing my own library values (whether I agree with them or not). That would be people like you @megingle. And there are people on Twitter who I consider have been mentors in the past (and yes – that’s you @librarykris)

    If you think that Twitter is useful for mentoring, do you think it is more appropriate for a traditional, one-on-one mentoring relationship between an experienced person and a beginner, or a peer-mentoring approach, or a different sort entirely? Why? Or conversely, do you think that Twitter is perhaps not suited to mentoring or is not an appropriate tool to use in a mentoring relationship? Why? I think Twitter could be effective and useful in identifying potential mentoring relationships and for some interaction or summary of questions thrown open to others for feedback or experience. But I would see the bulk of the mentoring happening in a one on one forum.

  14. ukulelefi says:

    Great research topic Abby! Making time to do this now as I really

    ■ What do you think of when people talk about ‘mentoring’?
    I think of talking/ bouncing around ideas with another person or people who you ‘click’ with to support career growth.
    ■ Does your view of mentoring fit into what you do on Twitter? If so, how? If not, why?
    Sometimes yes and sometimes no. I think that because Twitter is something that anyone can read, the things that are ‘said’ are not alway the full story and there is not the depth that a ‘traditional’ mentoring relationship gives.
    ■ Do you see Twitter as a tool to enable you to form relationships?
    I have found it a great way to ‘meet’ others working in libraries and similar organisations.
    ■ If so, what kind of relationships does Twitter allow you to form?
    Ones that can be grown further by meeting those you’ve connected with here in real life say at conferences or going to their places of work.
    ■ How do you use Twitter to identify interesting people/mentors (in the library and information profession and wider) to follow and learn from?
    I follow those who are followed by those people I have ‘clicked’ with and follow people who follow me. Recently I have been thinking about unfollowing some people that I intially thought would spark ideas in me but fill their Twitter feeds with things that don’t speak to me.
    ■ Have you been mentored by someone on Twitter? Can you think of someone on Twitter you look up to as a mentor?
    I would say that I have sought advice on Twitter or commented when stuck on work/ study things and people on Twitter have given helpful advice/ encouragement.
    ■ Are you able to give an example of how you have used Twitter to either mentor/give someone
    ■ If you think that Twitter is useful for mentoring, do you think it is more appropriate for a traditional, one-on-one mentoring relationship between an experienced person and a beginner, or a peer-mentoring approach, or a different sort entirely? Why?
    I think it is useful for seeking encouragement and advice in a way that supports the immediate situation. Twitter also breaks down the barriers between those in higher level positions making it easy to bounce ideas around and grow relationships with ‘senior’ people. In my situation where I am geographically at least 1 hour away from other libraries, I find it great for sharing ideas.
    ■ Or conversely, do you think that Twitter is perhaps not suited to mentoring or is not an appropriate tool to use in a mentoring relationship? Why
    I use Twitter to keep up with library events and find it a great way to get encouragement when I need it. However, if I was in a bigger town with others in similar roles or people in similar organisations, I’d more actively look for a ‘traditional’ mentor. However, I am thinking about using the connections I have already made through Twitter to approach people to see if they’d like to support me more formally as a mentor. I prefer to actually talk about things and as Twitter is so public, there are sometimes things that shouldn’t be said there.

  15. Christineb1 says:

     What do you think of when people talk about ‘mentoring’?
    A relationship between an experienced person in the profession and someone who wants to go further, where they discuss opportunities, skills, talents and going forward – encouragement, support, and cheerleading/support. Somewhat private..not necessarily confidential, but not open to the world.
     Does your view of mentoring fit into what you do on Twitter? If so, how? If not, why?
    Nope, not how I see Twitter – I see Twitter as being open conversation which is brilliant in itself – but if I need reassurance or support I might want it to be more private – which is where mentoring works so well.
     Do you see Twitter as a tool to enable you to form relationships?
    Absolutely 
     If so, what kind of relationships does Twitter allow you to form?
    Mainly professional relationships, talking to librarians who I wouldn’t otherwise meet in person, and it means that when I do meet them in person, we’ve already got a base to start the relationship from.
     How do you use Twitter to identify interesting people/mentors (in the library and information profession and wider) to follow and learn from?
    I see who other people are following, read blogs from there, and see who is retweeting who.
     Have you been mentored by someone on Twitter? Can you think of someone on Twitter you look up to as a mentor?
    I don’t think I’ve used Twitter as a mentor or mentee – I consider some of the people I follow on Twitter to be mentors, but not using Twitter as a medium.
     Or conversely, do you think that Twitter is perhaps not suited to mentoring or is not an appropriate tool to use in a mentoring relationship? Why?
    I think it’s perhaps not that useful, due to it being so open – unless both the mentor and the mentee are happy with that sort of relationship.

  16. Sam (@datalibsam) says:

    What an interesting topic! Here’s some quick thoughts.

    Q: What do you think of when people talk about ‘mentoring’?
    A: A confidential and formal / semi-formal arrangement over a period of time in which one person seeks career advice and development from someone that they perceive as able to help them achieve some fairly explicit goals.

    Q: Does your view of mentoring fit into what you do on Twitter? If so, how? If not, why?
    A: Not really, no. I see Twitter more as interaction amongst peers. The openness, informality, speed and ephemerality are part of what makes Twitter useful but I don’t see these as the things I want in a mentoring relationship.

    Q: Do you see Twitter as a tool to enable you to form relationships?
    A: Absolutely! And one thing I really enjoy is getting to meet people in real life after following them on Twitter. As an introvert it is really nice to be able to find people that you feel you already know at an event!

    Q: If so, what kind of relationships does Twitter allow you to form?
    A: As someone who has often been in jobs where there is no-one in my own organisation and few people maybe in the country to talk to about work-related issues, the professional relationships I’ve formed via Twitter have really helped. I ask questions, get answers to questions, find out what’s going on (new projects and initiatives) and get recommendations for professional reading and events (Twitter has largely replaced email lists for me in this respect). I used to have a second Twitter account for a more personal/social interest (poetry), but I found that fell by the wayside, so now it is primarily professional relationships now (though many of my best friends are librarians too, so it does get a bit blurry).

    Q: How do you use Twitter to identify interesting people/mentors (in the library and information profession and wider) to follow and learn from?
    A: Finding people via retweets from people I already follow is probably the main way.I am also a serial Twitter lurker at conferences that I can’t attend (including some that are not just about libraries e.g. Museums and the Web, Webstock, the National Digital Forum in NZ, open government related things). When a conference is on, I add a column to Tweetdeck for the conference hashtag and often find new people with interesting things to say that way.

    Q: Have you been mentored by someone on Twitter? Can you think of someone on Twitter you look up to as a mentor?
    A: There are people in my Twitter network that might fall into that category, but the mentoring has taken place through other channels.

    Q: Are you able to give an example of how you have used Twitter to either mentor/give someone advice, or receive mentorship/advice from someone else?
    A: Just this week, I received a tweet linking to a blog post. One of the comments in response to the post mentioned a newly developed tool that could be quite useful in my work. I tweeted about the tool (saying that it was new to me but looked useful) and one of the developers of the tool (already in my Twitter network) got in touch with me. After a series of direct messages, she has signed me up to their collaborative workspace for receiving updates and possibly trialling the tool in future. I wouldn’t be surprised if this turned into a full-blown collaboration at some point.

    Q: If you think that Twitter is useful for mentoring, do you think it is more appropriate for a traditional, one-on-one mentoring relationship between an experienced person and a beginner, or a peer-mentoring approach, or a different sort entirely? Why?
    A: I would probably not use Twitter in this way myself, as a mentor or as a mentee. I use it to communicate with peers, but I see this more as knowledge sharing than mentoring.

    Q: Or conversely, do you think that Twitter is perhaps not suited to mentoring or is not an appropriate tool to use in a mentoring relationship? Why?
    A: My best experiences of mentoring (both as a mentor and as a mentee) have involved the setting of some explicit goals to work towards, a lot of reflection, a timeframe of 6-12 months, and confidentiality. I’m not sure Twitter would be my tool of choice to achieve any of those things!

  17. Pingback: The Octopus Librarian | The final chapter: Last assignment(s) of my degree!

  18. Pingback: Are you my mentor? Mentoring in the Twittersphere | The Octopus Librarian

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